Conscious Classroom Management by Rick Smith Part 1

DON’T LET THIS BE YOU!

EVERY SINGLE TEACHER MUST READ THIS BOOK–ESPECIALLY NEW TEACHERS.  And I’m calling you a FOOL if you don’t.

That’s how much I stand by the content of Conscious Classroom Management by Rick Smith, and how essential I think it is for teachers to read.

I truly wish I had this book during my dark moments of teaching.  These were the times when I identified with “Mrs. Meanswell”.  If you read the book, you will understand that Mrs. Meanswell represents the teacher who tries and tries to do what’s best for her students in terms of classroom management, but does not succeed.  “Mrs. Allsgood,” on the other hand,  is the teacher whose stellar classroom management is observed by Mrs. Meanswell as a means to learn and improve.

What Rick Smith highlights, though, is this:  much of what makes classroom management effective is UNSEEN AND INVISIBLE TO THE NAKED EYE. That’s right.  His book renders me speechless in terms of finding adjectives to explain just how necessary it is for every teacher to read it.  And I’m not getting a dime from Rick Smith, but I know how much it has already helped me in terms of using my “inner authority” and assuming the best about my students.

FOR THAT MATTER, EVERY ADMINISTRATOR NEEDS TO READ THIS BOOK.  ALL OF YOU WHO AIM TO HELP NEW TEACHERS BECOME BETTER TEACHERS–YOU NEED THIS BOOK TOO!!!

Now why do I add that school administrators need to read this book?  Well, I was put through the rigmarole and made to feel like an ineffective nincompoop, because when I completed “walkthroughs” and “observations” of other teachers’ classrooms, I wasn’t able to carry some of the fairy dust into my own classroom.  And the administrators who were there to support me were unenlightened as to how to support my improving my classroom management skills.  But they were sure good at pointing out when a teacher “had it” and when I “didn’t have it.”  But thank god I know how to help myself help myself.

Fellow teachers, you know what I’m talking about.  When you have your moments of weakness, can’t figure out what you’re doing wrong-even if you’re doing something wrong–and there’s no one there to shine the light on your weakness, but there are plenty of people around pointing their fingers at you–even your students.  And then you feel like giving up.  You feel like quitting, because well, you think you suck and are a bad teacher.  Or the school and parents have the problem and not you.  And many of us do quit for these reasons.

But you are not a bad teacher.  You are a growing teacher who is learning every single day.  Teaching is a craft, an art form, that you have to study, learn and perfect until you get it right.

This book is my answer to them, those naysayers, those stone-throwers, who know best how to tear a teacher down instead of building them up.  I did not have typical classroom management issues for lack of trying to stop them, they happened because much of what makes a teacher a great classroom manager is invisible.  You know what I’m talking about reader, you know what it feels like to be in a classroom where teaching and learning is empowered because the teacher has total management of her classroom.  Rick Smith makes “conscious” what it is that this teacher has done or is doing.

The best feat this book accomplishes is that through simple conversational language, vignettes, and sensible strategies, it will expose you to the psychology behind what makes teachers great and students greater.

Please visit Rick’s website Conscious Teaching. I will pause here, because I want you to read this book.  Do yourself a favor.

Leave a Comment Starter:  Reflect on his book!  What is your greatest take-away?  (I know you will have so many!)

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